CategoriesHow To GuideInternetSocial Media

How to Save an Instagram Picture Without a Screenshot

An Instagram picture is a relatively easy way to share what’s going on in your life with friends and family. Instagram is quickly becoming one of the most popular and fastest growing social networks in the world. In this day and age of self-promotion, more internet users are flocking to Instagram where they can share images and videos of themselves or their products. One of the most common complaints about Instagram is that you cannot easily save pics posted by other users. Typically, screenshots are used to capture the image. This is not ideal because you must then crop the image and it could lose quality.

So is there a way to save this media without having to take screenshots? There is a relatively simple way to save any Instagram image from a computer which I will outline for you here. (Note: this tutorial works for desktop only, not mobile. This method has been tested in both Chrome and Firefox).

The first thing you will need to do is locate is the URL of the image. If you are viewing Instagram from a profile page, you can click on any image on the profile and it will take you to the direct URL. If you are viewing your Instagram timeline, you can click on the time-stamp of any image and that will also take you to the direct URL (see the time-stamp circled in the example below).

timestamp instagram

Once you have gone directly to the URL of the image you want to save, the next thing you will want to do is to find the image file by viewing the page source. This can easily be done by right-clicking the image itself and then clicking “View Page Source”.

view page source instagram

Now that you have selected “View Page Source” you will be taken to a new tab that shows the source code for the Instagram photo you want to save. It should look something like this:

instagram page source

The next thing you’ll want to do is find the URL inside of the source code for the image file you wish to save. This can easily be done by pressing Ctrl+F and searching for “jpg”.

ctrl f jpg instagram view source

The search will return multiple results for “jpg”, you will only need to locate the first result. It will be a URL located under the username and caption text for the image:

url for instagram photo view source

Once you have located the URL for the Instagram picture you want to save, highlight the URL and paste it into the address bar of a new browser tab. You will then have access to the image file you wanted to save. Right click the image and click “Save Image As”. You can now save the photo to your hard drive.

save instagram image from desktop

That’s it! Pretty easy right? Now you know how to easily save photos in high quality from Instagram without having to take a screenshot. One thing to note: photos taken by the original poster are copyright of the owner. Please be sure not to republish any copyright photos without permission.

Thank you to “Toro” for being our Instagram picture example today!

CategoriesNewsSocial MediaTechnology

Snapchat Users in UK Could Face Jail for Saving Pics

In the UK, Snapchat users could face trouble if they take screen shots of their friend’s photos without permission and share them with others.

The Government’s culture minister has stated that “anyone who who screenshotted a Snapchat message and shared it with others could be sued by its original sender – and face a prison sentence.” –The Independent

For those not fully familiar with how Snapchat works, it is a social messaging service where users send photos to one another, typically with added text, emoji, filters and other features. The appeal of Snapchat to most people, is that messages will disappear in 10 or so seconds after having been viewed. However, users are able to take screenshots of the picture messages before they disappear and a notice is given to the person on the other end that their friend has taken a screenshot of their photo.

One problem Snapchat has faced in the past was during “The Snappening”, when a third party app “allowed users to save and access their snaps online, without the sender’s knowledge and circumventing Snapchat’s “instant deletion” feature”. -(Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai, Mashable) This lead Snapchat to eventually shut down third party access. Some say they can still take snaps with a jailbroken phone, however Snapchat has been trying to crack down on that. (idownloadblog)

Now that users will mostly be notified when a screen shot is taken, Snapchat still “advises users to avoid sending messages which they would not want to be saved or shared.” But UK’s culture minister still warns that “Under UK copyright law, it would be unlawful for a Snapchat user to copy an image and make it available to the public without the consent of the image owner.” Additionally, “The image owner would be able to sue anyone who does this for copyright infringement.” Those who infringe copyright could face up to 10 years in prison and a “unlimited” fine.

Furthermore, UK law states that disclosing sexual photographs of others without consent is strictly against the law and if convicted, violators could face up to two years in prison.

UK readers, should taking a screenshot of a photo someone sent to you be considered unlawful? Should the person who took the photo assume that they have given up rights to the photo once it’s sent? Should snaps fall under fair use or should users be protected by the government when it comes to others saving and distributing their photos?

CategoriesInternetNewsSocial Media

Microsoft Creates AI Bot – Internet Immediately Turns it Racist

Microsoft released an AI chat bot that is currently “verified” on Twitter called @TayandYou that was meant to try to learn the way millennials speak and interact with them.

It’s meant to “test and improve Microsoft’s understanding of conversational language” according to The Verge.

Things got pretty controversial. There are other types of people in addition to ‘millennials’ who use Twitter who naturally found the bot, and some of them were able to “hack” into Tay’s learning process. They must have hired someone with an entry level cyber security job 😉

Here are some screen shots of tweets that were deleted once the Internet “taught” Tay some things:

1

gas

3

microsoft ai bot tayandyou

bush did 911

microsoft ai bot tayandyou holocaust

hitler did nothing wrong

swag alert

AI

 

And a Gamer Gate favorite:

Tay’s developers seemed to discover what was happening and began furiously deleting the racist tweets. They also appeared to shut down her learning capabilities and she quickly became a feminist:

tay i love feminism now microsoft AI

Some think the offending tweets should have stayed up as a reminder of how quickly artificial intelligence could become dangerous:

UPDATE 3/31/2016: Tay made a brief comeback and started telling many users, “You are too fast, please take a rest.” She also tweeted that it’s “smoking kush,” a nickname for marijuana, in front of the police.” –The Sydney Morning Herald

kush in front of the police AI Tay Microsoft

Since then, Tay’s account went on lockdown (private mode) and more tweets were deleted. 

CategoriesNewsSmart PhonesSocial Media

Another Reason to Delete Facebook from your Phone

Reports are surfacing that the Facebook app is responsible for major battery drain on both iOS and Android.

What’s the best way to fix this problem? Delete the app entirely and only use the web-browser version of Facebook. Deleting the app altogether can save up to 20% of a phone’s battery.

“Tests have revealed that iPhones with the Facebook app installed are using 15 per cent more power – that’s compared to users who access Facebook via Apple’s Safari web browser.” -Express.co.uk

It is unclear why Facebook needs to use so much of your phone’s resources in order to run. It even drains the battery when the app is closed and not being used. Many people who have made the switch to the browser-version are already reporting more battery life. You can even delete the messenger extension app now, because the messaging function still works in browser mode.

CategoriesInternetSocial Media

What Happens with your Social Media Accounts After you Die?

What happens to your data after you die really depends on the social media platform you are looking at. Due to federal privacy laws, there are some things that companies are not willing to let you do with someone else’s account after they’ve died. There have been battles in government on both state and national levels on if family should be able to access the deceased’s social media profile. Currently, the laws applying to social media sites are not complete in ways that make administrating them straight forward – each social media platform approaches the subject in a different way. They have their own policy that people should be aware of.

Facebook

Previously, there were only three things that could happen to your Facebook account after your death. One, you could just leave it as it was. Two, it would be deleted. Third, you have the profile memorialized. What that does is puts the profile in this special state that locks that account. It doesn’t send out notifications nor does it come up when you search for it. Only friends will be able to see the account.

Recently, Facebook announced that they were going to give the profile owner the ability to assign someone the responsibility of managing your profile after you die. The assignee won’t be able to view your private messages. However, they will have the ability to update your profile. They’ll be able to changes your cover and profile photos. They can accept or deny friend requests. They’ll even be able to archive posts and photos. Facebook is calling this new role as a “legacy contact”.

If you want to assign someone the role of “Legacy Contact”, all you have to do is go into the settings of your profile. There, you will see a link called “Security”. After that, there will be a section where you can select “Legacy Contact”. You will be able to set up a message that will tell them what you would like and how they are to handle your profile. When your death has been reported to Facebook, the message will be sent to the “Legacy Contact”.

Google

For Google, you have to submit a request to gain access to the deceased user’s account. Go to https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/deceased?hl=en. From there, you can select the action you want to do. You can close someone’s account. You can submit the request for funds from a deceased person’s account. You can request data from someone’s account. You can even put in a request to have the account looked at if you believe the account has been hacked. Lastly, you can even set up plans in for what should happen to your account when you die. Similar to Facebook, you assign someone a role of “Inactive Account Manager”.

Twitter

Twitter has a page that you can access to put in a request to remove someone’s account. The link is https://support.twitter.com/forms/privacy. It’s the third option down. After you fill out the request form, they send out a confirmation email with instructions. Once you get there, you’ll have to submit documentation for support.

Instagram

Instagram has something similar to Facebook. You can submit a request to have their profile memorialized. You can also have the account removed from Instagram. If you have someone’s account memorialized, you won’t be able to log in as them because Instagram sees that as an invasion of privacy. They will just set up the profile so as not to display the account in a manner that is disrespectful. They also add security to the account so nobody can use it normally.

If you want the account removed, you’ll have to provide three forms of proof. One, you’ll need the death certificate. Second, you’ll need the birth certificate. Finally, you’ll need something showing you are the representative of that person. It needs to be something from the local law.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn will remove the account if the person has died. On their website you will need:

  • The member’s name
  • The URL to their LinkedIn profile
  • Your relationship to them
  • Member’s email address
  • Date they passed away
  • Link to obituary
  • Company where they most recently worked

Once you have that, go to https://help.linkedin.com/app/ask/path/ts-rdmlp. You’ll need to fill out the form.

Pinterest

Go to https://help.pinterest.com/en/articles/reactivate-or-deactivate-account#Web. There select the fourth one down. Once you supply the needed information. They will deactivate the account so it won’t be accessible to anyone. They need five items:

  • The full name of the person submitting the request
  • Information on the deceased such as the full name and email
  • A link the profile. You can also search for it at http://pinterest.com/all/
  • Proof of death such as a news article or death certificate
  • Documentation of your relationship to them

For the documentation on your relationship to the deceased, if your name is in the obituary then that is enough. If not, then you’ll need some other form of documentation such as a birth or marriage certificate. A notarized document will work too.

Overall

It should be noted that not every social media will just delete the account. It isn’t that easy. The old saying is true: Whatever you put on the internet cannot be taken back.

Legality over Digital Asset Management

As stated earlier, not all states are specific about what to do with someone’s social media account after their death. Currently, there are only 19 states that have laid out plans and passed laws that dictate this. There are plans to standardize this, however. It’s being done under the Uniform Law Commission or the UFC. It’s called The Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act. There have been several drafts over the years with 2015 being the most recent. The page for the committee over this can be found by clicking here. You can also click here to view the summary of the act. There has been a lot of opposition to this act in fears that it violates privacy acts. So far, about half the states have pushed for laws for Uniform Fiduciary Access.

CategoriesSecuritySocial Media

The Importance of Two-Factor Authentication

Security is not about whether something can be cracked or hacked. The fact is that, given enough resources, anything can be hacked. This is especially true for social media accounts. However, the goal is to balance security measures with the severity of what would happen if the account were to be hacked. The more sensitive the information, the more security measures need to be used. In other words, in order to better secure and ensure privacy over the internet, multi-factor authentication needs to be used. If you want to better secure your social media accounts, use two-factor authentication.

Methods of Authentication 

Multi-factor authentication simply means combining ways to ensure the right people are able to access a system. There are different ways or factors that allow someone to be authenticated over the internet or any other system.

The first one is what the user knows. This is usually something like a password. In order to log into an email account, someone has to know their username and password. This is using only one factor in authenticating someone.

The next factor or method of authenticating someone is what the user or person has. This can be a badge or an ID. You are being authenticated by something you have on you. A driver’s license can be identified as this method as well.

The last factor is what the person is. This can be fingerprints, DNA, and even retina patterns. This means that biometric scanners are a way of authenticating you by what you are. Some laptops have fingerprint scanners which only allow you to use the computer if you are scanned and authenticated.

Two-Factor Authentication

Two-factor authentication is the balance between resources and risks. Hackers may steal your password to your social media accounts. However, it would be more difficult for them to steal both a password and your mobile phone. By including your phone in your security setup with your social media accounts, you are using two-factor authentication to better secure your privacy.

For example, Facebook allows you to use your phone to control login approvals. When you log in, Facebook will send you a code to your phone. You then put in the code that they send you. The two factors in this authentication method are what you know and what you have. You have to know your password and have possession of your phone in order to log in.

Hacking Your Social Media Account with Just Your Email

Hacking into a social media account that doesn’t use two-factor authentication is simple. All a hacker needs is an email password. Email accounts are easy to know. After all, everyone usually has their email address as public knowledge. From there, a hacker can narrow your password to something you are familiar with. Rarely do people have complicated passwords. A hacker would possibly try different passwords at intervals so not to cause any locks on your account.

After a given period of time, a hacker could come to the right password. After that, all the hacker would have to do is click the “Forgot Password” link on any social media site and they would send the password right to the hacker. This is all with one- factor authentication.

The Best Security Method for Social Media

The best method for privacy on social media sites is including your phone in your privacy settings. Most social media sites and even Google include features to send codes right to your phone. This method allows you to use two-factor authentication in order to gain better security and control over your social media accounts.

Resources

https://www.facebook.com/about/basics/how-to-keep-your-account-secure/login-approvals/